April Health and Safety Training with Students for Health Equity!

Chicago Action Medical hosted a protest health and safety training co-sponsored by Students for Health Equity in late April of this year. Students for  Health Equity or SHE is a UChicago student group that organizes around health care justice on the south side. In this short training, we discussed tips for staying healthy and safe while protesting! We covered what to bring and what not to bring to a protest, how to be prepared for different weather conditions, working with a buddy, police weapons and tactics, know your rights, jail support and did an eye flush demo.

Here are some pictures from Students for Health Equity from the training. If your organization is interested in a health and safety or a longer 20+ hour street medic training, feel free to contact us at chicagoactionmedical@riseup.net or get in touch through our Facebook page  or our twitter.

Some tips for what to say from our handout if the police approach you, detain you at a protest, come to your house and try to serve a warrant or want to come in your house.

SHE.training.protest2policeresponse

A booklet from the Center for Constitutional Rights about what to do if you or your organization is approached by federal law enforcement.

SHE.training.ifanagentknocks

Eye flush demos in the spring sun!

SHE.training.eyeflush1 SHe.training.eyeflush2

More Ferguson and St. Louis Trainings

Street medics will be at two upcoming direct action trainings in St. Louis, and leading a health and safety in the streets training immediately following Saturdays direct action training. See the flyer below for more information. Ferguson DA trainings

Also, this coming Sunday there will be a full day training:

Affinity Group Medic Training

This full day course covers basic first aid knowledge for taking care of yourself and your friends at protests. Going more in depth to the information covered in the shorter Health and Safety training, this training will also cover basic first aid for injuries common or catastrophic at protests, including hypothermia, breathing emergencies, head trauma, car accidents, and gun shot wounds.

This training will also be for healthcare providers who want to help staff first aid stations or help on the street during the expected protests.

Note that this is not a CPR course, any official certification, or the full 20-hour Street Medic Training designed to train people to run as marked medics providing care for an entire crowd of protestors. Sliding scale $0-30, lunch provided, participants will receive a first aid kit.

Registration optional, but highly encouraged: http://goo.gl/forms/euJq3qZTDd

When: Sunday, Nov 9th, 10am-6pm

Where: First Congregational Church, 6501 Wydown Blvd (Btwn Big Bend and Skinker), near Metrolink U City / Big Bend station or Metrobus #2 Red Line

AG training flyer

Support Street Medics in St. Louis and Ferguson

Make ONLINE donations of $10 or more, by clicking here

 NOTE: Online donations will be processed by the Illinois Justice Foundation and Network for Good, and will appear as such on your credit card statement. They are tax-deductible.
Please be sure to enter CAM or “Chicago Action Medical” in the Designation field of the donation form.

Street medics are a nationwide movement of healthcare providers and trained lay volunteers that provide first aid and medical support at protests for social change. In the past three months street medics have been supporting the protests that have been happening almost daily in Ferguson and St. Louis, Missouri. These protests have been in response to the killing of Michael Brown, Jr. by Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson, as well as in reaction to systematic racial injustice in the police and criminal justice systems that the killing has laid bare.

In the first weeks of protests in Ferguson, street medics from across the country helped to establish a first aid tent, offered health and safety trainings focusing on exposure to chemicals such as tear gas , reached out to local organizations and leaders, and started to build local street medic capacity. All of this was in addition to providing first aid coverage on the streets.

St. Louis now has a small but energized medic collective planning for the larger protests expected if the grand jury returns without an indictment. Street medics will be providing medical care to protestors in places where ambulances will not go. We will also be staffing first aid stations at multiple places of worship. Clergy are organizing these spaces into safe havens for protesters to rest and find sanctuary. Medics are leading comprehensive health and safety workshops, and we are reaching out to local organizations to create specialized trainings for their needs.

Chicago Action Medical (CAM) is a street medic collective that has been on the ground throughout the protests and has taken a lead role in establishing much of the medic infrastructure. CAM members are working full time in St. Louis preparing for the grand jury verdict. Donations made through this site pay for trainings and supplies. All money raised online from now until any actions are over will be spent in St. Louis and Ferguson, according to the needs of the local medics.

It has been an honor to work with the many organizations and individuals who have been leading the protests on the ground. We have been in awe at the power of this movement and look forward to on-going support of these actions, which we believe have the potential to change the national conversation about police and community interaction and bring about real change.

Upcoming Trainings in St. Louis

Chicago Action Medical is proud to be working with St. Louis local street medics to provide trainings ahead of expected protests in St. Louis and Ferguson if the grand jury investigating officer Darren Wilson returns without an indictment for the murder of Mike Brown. We have three trainings planned, two shorter 2-hour trainings this coming weekend and a longer 8-hour training planned for Sunday the 9th. See below for more information on the planned trainings, and e-mail chicagoactionmedical@riseup.net with any questions or to request any additional trainings. *Check back for updates, and trainings will probably not happen if the grand jury returns first.

Health and Safety In the Streets

This short protest safety workshop covers steps you can take to help stay safe on the streets, police weapons and tactics, eye flushes for pepper spray and teargas exposure, and other topics. It will be part lecture, part practice, and free. For a more comprehensive training with more first aid skills see the info below on the Affinity Group Medic Training.

TWO TIMES TO CHOOSE FROM!
When:
Sat, Nov 1 from 1 to 3 pm
When:
Sun, Nov 2 from 1 to 3 pm

Christ the King UCC Church
11370 Old Halls Ferry Road
Florissant, MO 63033

9.1 and 9.2 H&S Flyer

Affinity Group Medic Training

This full day course covers basic first aid knowledge for taking care of yourself and your friends at protests. Going more in depth to the information covered in the shorter Health and Safety training, this training will also cover basic first aid for injuries common or catastrophic at protests, including hypothermia, breathing emergencies, head trauma, car accidents, and gun shot wounds. Note that this is not a CPR course, any official certification, or the full 20-hour Street Medic Training designed to train people to run as marked medics providing care for an entire crowd of protestors. Sliding scale $0-30, lunch provided, participants will receive a first aid kit.

Registration optional, but highly encouraged: http://goo.gl/forms/euJq3qZTDd

When: Sunday, Nov 9th, 10am-6pm

Where: First Congregational Church, 6501 Wydown Blvd (Btwn Big Bend and Skinker), near Metrolink U City / Big Bend station or Metrobus #2 Red Line

AG training flyer

ANNOUNCING: our brand-new trainings page

Do you find yourself wishing that you knew how to support yourself and your friends in difficult situations? How about responding to life-threatening emergencies? Or maybe you want to learn what to do about that pesky pepperspray.

Chicago Action Medical is excited to announce a new page on our website where you can find out about these trainings and more!

If you, your friends, or your community organization is interested in hosting a training, take a look at our trainings page to see what we offer and then get in touch with us.

See you in a training,

Chicago Action Medical

Cold Weather Advisory

This post is a reprint of a Cold Weather Advisory sent out by Chicago 2nd Ward Alderman Bob Fioretti.

As temperatures around Chicago continue to drop, we want to remind everyone to use precautions to stay safe this winter. According to the National Weather Service in Chicago, temperatures will be in the single digits and below over the next few days, creating dangerous wind chills.

When you go outside, dress accordingly, make sure you have a hat and gloves and that exposed skin is covered. Limit the time you and your pet spends outside and try to avoid overexerting yourself. Make sure pipes in your home are properly insulated and not exposed to freezing air to limit the chance of the pipe freezing. Keep an emergency kit in your vehicle with cables and extra blankets and make sure you have adequate gas when on the road. Always check the forecast when going out to make sure you are properly prepared. 

Currently, the Warming Center at 10 S. Kedzie Avenue is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Due to the extreme cold, all six DFSS Community Service Centers will serve as Warming Centers with extended times from Sunday, January 5th to Tuesday, January 7th from 9:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.       

 DFSS COMMUNITY SERVICE CENTER LOCATIONS

Englewood Center, 1140 W. 79th Street

Garfield Center, 10 S. Kedzie Avenue

King Center, 4314 S. Cottage Grove

North Area, 845 W. Wilson Avenue

South Chicago, 8650 S. Commercial Avenue, 

Trina Davila, 4357 W. Armitage Avenue

 

Additional community facilities that serve as Warming Centers are libraries, Park District buildings and senior centers. Transportation is provided for the elderly and the disabled who cannot get to a Warming Center on their own. Call 311 for current information on Warming Center locations and hours. 
 
In the event of more snow, we remind you to please clear the walkway in front of your residence or home. Without a wide, clear path through snow and ice, it is especially difficult for people with disabilities, seniors and children to walk safely. According to the Municipal Code of Chicago (4-4-310 & 10-8-180), property owners and occupants are responsible for keeping sidewalks clear of snow and ice. 
 
Additionally, if you know of any friends or neighbors who may need some extra assistance during the colder weather, please check-in on them. As always, you can also call my City Service office at (312) 263-9273 for assistance during regular business hours. Please call 911 if there is an emergency.

Reportback: Wicker Park Noise Demo

On Friday 20 September there was a noise demonstration in Wicker Park.

Two medics ran. The protest started with around 30 mostly young participants. There were no people with evident mobility issues. We observed no injuries but did dispense two band aids to people who came up to us with cuts on their fingers and gave out two throat lozenges. There were no arrests.

The overall vibe of the action was festive and chill.

About 8 police including a couple white shirts and one tactical officer were on Damen next to the park waiting for the demonstration to start while people gathered at the fountain. We left the park a little after 9:00 and went directly into the street on Damen and kept the street for the duration of the march. Medics stayed toward the back to be able to see everything. The police followed at a distance of two or three car lengths effectively running interference for us by preventing other vehicles from zooming up on us from behind. During the action when a police car on a call or ambulances approached, protesters called out to each other and cleared the street until they passed.

We went north to the six corner intersection of Damen, North, and Milwaukee where demonstrators lingered in the intersection briefly before heading east on North Ave.
After a few blocks we turned south and followed that street to where it connected with Milwaukee then headed back north to Milwaukee/Damen/North Ave again. This time the protesters went into the middle of the intersection where they danced, chanted, and banged pots and pans for a couple minutes then looped around counterclockwise while cars were also moving through the intersection. Medics had moved to the sidewalk for safety and a wider view of the scene. Three or four police cars moved in and blocked the west side of the intersection. This is when several cops got out of their cars and approached the protestors who then moved out of the intersection quickly. Police on foot shadowed the rest of the action.

We headed south on Milwaukee with around six police on foot including a sargent and the tac officer. At two or three places along Milwaukee it felt like a snatch and grab might be brewing when police on foot moved closer, watching protesters more intently and even moved into fringes of the group. Medics got on the sidewalk at these points to avoid potential arrest. Fortunately, the tension eased each time.

At Milwaukee and Division protesters took eastbound Division the short distance to Ashland and then scattered into stopped westbound traffic and ran back west, crossing Milwaukee and continuing west on division. Numbers by now had thinned to around 20 Around this point one demonstrator who had been displaying a penchant for moving into the opposite lane of traffic whenever it was stopped and walking in front of, around and between cars while taking a video, amped it up a couple notches. We kept a closer eye on them for the rest of the action.

Protesters held the intersection of Divison and Damen for several minutes. Some danced and chanted while others crouched behind a large sign in the center of the intersection. Some of the cars who had the light were not slowing down very much and protesters who were dancing or weaving around taking pictures seemed not very cognizant of moving cars. It was some anxious observing for medics standing on the sidewalk.

We continued west a couple blocks, doubled back and turned north up Damen. We noticed we no longer had police cars following and only two patrol officers on foot remained who had fallen back a half a block or more behind the action.

We continued on Damen back to Damen/Milwaukee/North Ave to occupy the intersection once more with around 15 protesters remaining. There were no police cars and only two cops foot who hadn’t caught up with the action yet. This time protesters were being much more bold, standing in front of cars trying to pass through the intersection, surrounding some, circling around a limo while knocking on the windows and sitting on the fender as it pulled away. Others crouched to bang their pots on the pavement out of the view of close by cars. Everybody in the intersection ranged form vulnerable to really really vulnerable.The cops on foot caught up, and a couple more materialized. They began to manage traffic and order protesters out of the intersection who headed back south on Damen to the park where the action came to a close at around 11:00 or 11:30.